Select Page

TechLadies 2016 – Year in Review

How was your 2016? I hope it was as great as ours! It’s still a little hard to believe that TechLadies was only launched in 2016, I still remember it like it was yesterday.

Despite being less than 1 year old, we’ve touched 629 people with our events, workshops & bootcamps; taught 111 ladies how to code; and saw 3 of these ladies getting internships and 2 more ladies hired as junior software engineers.

Thank you for an awesome 2016 and for being part of TechLadies! 🎉

Let’s take a quick look at what we did in 2016.

January

27 Jan – TechLadies was born!

TechLadies had our launch party at Facebook Singapore where the community get to know who we are, learn about the TechLadies Bootcamp was about, and hear from a panel of industry experts on what it’s like to be a women in tech. Thank you to our global panel of speakers Michelle, Ludwine, Hui Jing and Aislinn who graciously contributed their time!

I was initially worried if we could fill up the venue (which our coach Hui Jing assured me that if nobody showed up, we’ll have our own private party) but we filled it up with a bunch of amazing passionate women! I am AWED.

29 Jan – Our launch was covered by e27!

The launch event was covered by e27, one of the best tech site in Asia. I particularly like this quote I gave, and it still rings true today.

TechLadies was started when so many people volunteered to help. It’s easy to give me all the credits because I’m the face of TechLadies, but really, it was the people who helped that inspired me to start TechLadies.

And as the writer Kevin McSpadden puts it, “time to put on those coding capes.

February

20 Feb – We had the first TechLadies Bootcamp!

9 ladies were chosen out of 129 applicants to participate in the first TechLadies Bootcamp. Back then, we called the program TechLadies Coding Programme but changed the name because it was too long and we often confused ourselves if we were using the British or American spelling for “programme”.

These ladies worked in groups of 3, spent at least 15 hours a week to create web applications for 3 non-profit organizations – Humanitarian Organisation for Migration Economics, Asian Film Archive and Engineers.SG.

Read about their stories here:  SharonVinaXin TianKateYitingCasieSandyErika, and Cornet.

May

5 May – We held the first TechLadies Graduation Party!

The newly minted tech ladies have graduated from the TechLadies Bootcamp and presented their applications to 180 attendees at Google Singapore. 2 of these graduates will eventually get into programming internships, and 2 more were hired as software engineers. Proud of all of them! You can watch the video recording of the event here. 

18 May – We kicked off the TechLadies Tech Talks series!

The TechLadies Bootcamp grads had the idea of creating a platform for beginners to share their technical knowledge. Running with that idea, TechLadies Tech Talks was born! In these talks, you will learn about various programming languages from ladies who are picking up the skill. We held the first of this series in May, featuring the Ruby programming language. You can watch the video recording of the event here. 

29 May – TechLadies was featured in The Sunday Times!


Kate (our bootcamp grad), Jaryl (her coach) and I were featured on The Sunday Times as part of their feature on tech education in Singapore. You can read the article at this link.

June

24 June – Xin Tian spoke at the Red Dot Ruby Conference!


Our bootcamp grad, Xin Tian, gave a lightning talk at the Ruby conference in Singapore, sharing the lessons she learned from learning how to code in Ruby. In the audience is Matz, the creator of the Ruby programming language! You can watch her talk here. 

August

2 Aug – TechLadies Bootcamp returned!


The bootcamp was back, and this time BIGGER! We have expanded our intake from 9 to 15, and helping 5 NGOs use technology for good. We held an info session where the NGOs presented the challenges they were facing, the coaches gave a quick introduction on what solutions the bootcamp participants would be building, and we heard from Audrey, Nithya, and Olivia exploring the possible careers paths in the tech industry. You can watch the video recording of the event here. 

Also, this is our biggest event so far!

6, 13, 20 Aug – We ran 3 pre-bootcamp workshops!


We learned that it is important for TechLadies Bootcamp participants to have some sort of programming foundation in order to build a web product that will be used by the NGOs. So we ran 3 workshops to teach women basic programming skills! 93 women attended these workshops, and 5 of them were chosen to participate in the TechLadies Bootcamp #2. You can watch the video recording of all 3 workshops here. 

11 Aug – We had the 2nd installment of the TechLadies Tech Talks on Python!

We shared about Python this time round. Do watch the talks by Vina and Junqi! 🐍

Sep

24 Sep – TechLadies Bootcamp #2 was ON!


15 ladies were selected for the TechLadies Bootcamp #2, out of 41 applicants. Why the drop in the number of applicants, you ask? Good question. That’s because we’ve upped the application requirements – each lady needs to create an application before they can apply for the bootcamp… to learn how to build an application. We are all amazed by the quality of applications these applicants created without much guidance!

28 Sep – We were mentioned in Tech in Asia!

Tech in Asia published an article on people making a mid-career switch into the tech industry and TechLadies was mentioned! Read the article here.

Oct

1 Oct – We were featured on Her World!

Singapore’s best-selling women’s magazine, Her World, ran a feature on TechLadies. Psst! That’s Ruby codes in there.

Dec

3 Dec – We concluded the TechLadies Bootcamp #2!


Sadly, a bootcamp participant decided to drop out of the program midway due to personal reasons (we wish her all the best!) and we couldn’t onboard someone new by then. 😔

Nonetheless, 14 ladies graduated from the TechLadies Bootcamp #2 and created applications for Mutts Rescue, I Am Talented, TOUCH Young Arrows, Highpoint Community Services Association, and Singapore Muslim Women’s Association. They will be showing you the apps they have made in Jan 2017!

It takes a village to raise a TechLady

Everything that we have achieved with TechLadies in 2016 is no doubt a community effort with people stepping up to volunteer their time, expertise, skills, and money. I’m grateful to each and every one of you who have helped us along the way. 😘

Thank you Xin Tian, Kate, Joelle, Cherie, Nikki, Amanda, Estella, Michelle, and Xinhua for volunteering your time in the less than glamorous job to make sure that the blog, Facebook page and our events happen.

Thank you Martin, Jaryl, Michael (for stepping up to be a coach at the last min), Sherwin, Ted, Laurence, Grzegorz, Gabe for spending 100 hours to bring more women into the tech industry.

Thank you Varun, Monika, Kiong, Jesstern, Sunny, Jen, Junqi, Guo Xiang, Ken, Martin, Aysha, Justin, Sher Minn, Sean for taking time out on Saturdays for the pre-bootcamp workshops.

Thank you Chee Aun, Gia and Wei Man for your UX/UI skills, and Engineers.SG for recording so much of our events. By documenting our events, you helped us maximize our impact.

And thank you sponsors The Artling, PayPal, Facebook, Google, IMDA Labs, Tinkerbox & Bitmazk for keeping TechLadies going!

Future Plans 💯

Woo! That was a long review article, wasn’t it?

For 2017, we’re going to do more for women around Asia. Yes! We are going overseas!!! ✈️✈️✈️✈️

Here’s what we have in store:

  • 17 Jan: TechLadies Bootcamp #2 – Graduation Party!
  • Feb onwards: TechLadies Study Groups
  • 18 – 19 Feb: TechLadies Coding Weekend in Kuala Lumpur
  • Apr – Aug: Pre-Bootcamp Workshops & TechLadies Bootcamp #3

We are also thinking of running TechLadies Coding Weekends in Indonesia, Vietnam, and Pakistan. Want TechLadies in your city? Email Elisha at elisha@techladies.co to get started!

Have a great 2017!

 

Stay curious,
Elisha & team

Meet JiaMin – Mathematician, Data Analyst, TechLady

The TechLadies Bootcamp is a 10-week part-time accelerated learning program designed to help women with some basic programming background become programmers. Participants are guided by industry experts, creating products for non-profit organizations. 15 ladies were chosen for the TechLadies Bootcamp #2. In this blog series, we will be sharing more about their backgrounds and learning journeys. Hopefully that'll inspire you to start learning how to code!

If you could tell a story about yourself in one or a few sentences, what would it be?

Born and raised in Brunei, I moved to Singapore to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematical Sciences at Nanyang Technological University where I discovered an unexpected love for coding. Upon graduation, I went on to complete a Masters of Science in Financial Mathematics at the University of Chicago. My passion for Mathematics stems from my enjoyment in tackling challenging problems.

My hobbies include yoga, baking and hiking.

What are you currently working as?

I am currently working as a Data Analyst at Bloomberg where I apply technology solutions to provide data to the financial markets in an accurate and timely manner. Previously I was working in a business development role at a construction company in Brunei.

What sparked your interest in learning how to code?

I love coding because it is really fun to break a complex problem into smaller pieces: solving them individually and compiling them together. There is something relaxing about isolating problems into little categories and solving them one at a time, and I experience that a lot when coding. Coding is fundamentally about creating solutions to problems. The best part about coding is that you can make things that are useful to other people and improve their lives in some way.

It wasn’t easy for me to come to love programming. Growing up in a traditional family, I would not receive any gadget or technology-related presents unlike my brothers as my parents believed that such toys were only for boys. So I never thought to explore or pick up any IT skills when I was younger. My first real exposure to programming happened when I was in college – where I had to take a class on C++ as part of my Math degree. That class blew my mind. It opened my eyes to programming and made me realized how much I enjoy creating applications and interacting with computers. I am very happy to be a part of TechLadies as I truly enjoy expanding my technical skills in a tight-knit community.

Growing up in a traditional family, I would not receive any gadget or technology-related presents unlike my brothers as my parents believed that such toys were only for boys. So I never thought to explore or pick up any IT skills when I was younger.

What was your first thought or reaction when you heard about TechLadies?

When I first heard about TechLadies after seeing their ads on Facebook, the first thought that came to my mind was how great the community-led initiative was in terms of introducing more women to the tech industry and encouraging them to have a career as programmers!

Why did you want to apply to the TechLadies Bootcamp?

I applied to TechLadies Bootcamp because although my work involves some programming, I don’t have any experience building a web application. Building a web application has always been one of my life goals because I am fascinated by the works of a web application. With Facebook, Google and the likes, applications play a big part in our everyday online life.

You had to create an app before you could apply to the bootcamp. Tell us more about the app you made!

For my application to the TechLadies Bootcamp, I created an events listing app (see my codes here). The choice was simple, I simply picked an idea out of the 4 ideas listed on the TechLadies website and ran with it. Attending all of the pre-bootcamp workshops definitely helped me with creating an application. I have also supplemented my learning journey by reading a bunch of online resources. I would definitely recommend RailsGirls guides and reading the documentation of the appropriate gems for the application.

Describe the TechLadies project you’re working on and why you selected this project. 

My TechLadies project is with I Am Talented, which helps students to discover their talents in non-academic pathways. This is especially meaningful to me because academically, I was a late bloomer. It might be hard to tell now, but I was really bad in Math back in primary school. I would always fail my exams despite how much time I’ve spent studying. My self-confidence took a big hit. It was only when I’ve graduated into secondary school where maths is all about logic and algebra (none of those abacus and memorizing work) that I started excelling in my studies.

Because of my experience, I understand that studying in Singapore can be stressful and damaging on one’s self-confidence. IAT struck me as a great social empowerment initiative for youths to not only discover their strengths but also hone their talents and overcome challenges. I hope that pursuing non-academic pathways may help students also similarly find their footing early on in life and develop their self-esteem. I believe it is important to develop the next generation as they are our future leaders. I also believe in the power of education and that education comes in many forms (not just academic).

How do you see yourself using your coding skills for in the future?

Through TechLadies Bootcamp, I hope to meet more women in the tech industry and to gain insights on having a career as a programmer. Besides that, I want to develop a web application that not only meets the basic requirement of I am Talented but to go above and beyond their specifications!

I would also like develop more web applications that can significantly improve people’s lives. In particular, I believe that information overload from endless streams of tweets, texts, emails or interesting articles on Facebook is a struggle many people face everyday. If I am able to develop an application that tackles this problem holistically, it would be a big check on my bucket list.

In the future, I would like to keep learning and developing my technical skills. Technology is an ever evolving industry and I believe there is much to learn in order to be agile and to remain relevant in the industry.

Meet Clara – Fashion Businesswoman, Curious Introvert, TechLady

The TechLadies Bootcamp is a 10-week part-time accelerated learning program designed to help women with some basic programming background become programmers. Participants are guided by industry experts, creating products for non-profit organizations. 15 ladies were chosen for the TechLadies Bootcamp #2. In this blog series, we will be sharing more about their backgrounds and learning journeys. Hopefully that'll inspire you to start learning how to code!
Clara Chow

If you could tell a story about yourself in one or a few sentences, what would it be?

A very socially awkward but curious introvert, that asks ‘why?’ too much. It is hard to convince me not to do something once I’ve set my mind on it.

Oh also, I like puns and I struggle with mornings.

What are you currently working as?

I have been running my online boutique selling self-designed apparel for about 5 years now. It is extremely challenging to manage all facets of the business and be 100% self-disciplined/motivated, but has been a fantastic learning experience. I don’t think any office job would have given me the experience and knowledge I gained whilst struggling without guidance through these years.

What sparked your interest in learning how to code?

I guess some part of me always loved web development. When I was a teenager, I built websites on Geocities for my adopted virtual pets to ‘live’ in. I promise this is cooler than it sounds. What got me hooked on web development was the immediate gratification programming provided — I could insert a code snippet and have the result rendered on the page instantly. To this day, I’m still awed by the magical process of transforming semi-gibberish into functional and useful websites that anyone can see on the WWW.

I wasn’t exactly a model student in school, and performed dismally for my A Levels. This severely limited my options in university and I ended up studying Project & Facilities Management – something I had neither passion nor interest in. After graduation, I worked at a desk job for an unfulfilling year before deciding to take the leap and start my own business.

Again, fashion wasn’t an industry I had particularly keen interest in. After 4+ years, my motivation to persist started waning quickly. I couldn’t see myself staying in this industry for the rest of my life. I thought: “Since I’ve always been keen in technology, why not rekindle that childhood flame? It’s time to move into the tech industry as a programmer.”

What got me hooked on web development was the immediate gratification programming provided — I could insert a code snippet and have the result rendered on the page instantly. To this day, I’m still awed by the magical process of transforming semi-gibberish into functional and useful websites that anyone can see on the WWW.

What was your first thought or reaction when you heard about TechLadies?

“YAASSSS”. I have been trying to pick up rails on my own for over a year now by attending workshops and meetups, but it wasn’t easy without any sort of structured syllabus and guidance. It was hard for me to acquire new knowledge systematically and build on it.

There was also this sense of a lack of purpose — I didn’t know what I wanted to (or could) build. Even if I did, the app would serve no significant purpose. I have toyed with the idea of approaching an NGO on my own to help them with their website, but would always chicken out because I lacked confidence in my own abilities. I didn’t want to take on a project that I couldn’t deliver on. The whole TechLadies initiative and TechLadies Bootcamp was like a sign — there was no excuse for me to not apply.

Why did you want to apply to the TechLadies Bootcamp?

I saw the Bootcamp as a way for me to do ‘disciplined learning’. There was:

  • A clear objective — building a functional app by the end of the bootcamp
  • Structure — weekly meetings with my team and a healthy number of hours I had to put in on my own prior to these meetings
  • A willing, experienced mentor <3
  • The teamwork element — working in a team is obviously more complicated than working solo, involving a whole different set of processes. There is also that sense of mutual support, learning and teaching.
  • A fantastic cause — helping an NGO become more efficient by lightening their administrative load

If you are someone looking to learn how to code, you’ll have to be seriously nuts if you do not at least apply and try to get into the program.

You had to create an app before you could apply to the bootcamp. Tell us more about the app you made!

My app is called The Foodlogger and it’s a meal tracking app. The idea for this app surfaced from a recent visit to the doctor. I have been living with Chronic Urticaria (commonly called Hives) for over a decade now, and recently went for a checkup to see if things have improved. The condition is basically an allergic reaction in the body and the trigger is unknown. Don’t worry! This is not contagious. Feel free to share hugs and high-fives with me!

The doctors did tell me that food is a very likely suspect in causing these daily allergic reactions. They gave me a list of common allergy triggers and suggested that I start a daily food log to find out which food group(s) were possibly contributing to my condition, and so the app was created!

Describe the TechLadies project you’re working on and why you selected this project. 

I am thrilled to be on the Touch Young Arrows (TYA) team! Like many other NGOs, they are currently using Excel spreadsheets to store, sort and analyse data. This process can be tedious, causing conflicts when there are multiple sources of info (which occurs frequently) and is prone to errors.

I picked this project as I was really drawn to the product’s complexity — I love a challenge! I watched the pre-bootcamp video of Grzegorz (the coach for this project) teaching basic Ruby concepts and really liked his teaching style. He could explain complicated concepts in a structured, broken down manner that I could understand for once! It made this project resonate with me even more.

How do you see yourself using your coding skills in the future?

I’m not sure if I have an unrealistic expectation of the future at this point in time, but I’ll like to be able to build complex, decent looking apps and to deploy on my own.

I also want to secure a job as a developer. Coding been really fulfilling for me and I haven’t felt so at ease with myself in a long time. Well… of course the process is frustrating at times when I just can’t get things to work, but in general, I’m really happy now. It is the thing that gets me out of bed in the morning, and I wake up feeling excited to attack the code! In a completely non-violent way, of course. I’d like to be a programmer at a company that could help me further develop my skills.

I would also love to build apps for more NGOs! They get an app, and I build up experience and competency. Everyone wins! If at some point in the future, I would love to spread the joy of coding by sharing my knowledge with other ladies who want to start coding.

Meet Cornet – Intern, Go-Getter, TechLady

The TechLadies Bootcamp is a 10-week part-time accelerated learning program designed to help women with some basic programming background become professional programmers. Participants are guided by industry experts, creating products for non-profit organizations. 9 ladies were chosen for the first batch of the TechLadies Bootcamp. In this blog series, we will be sharing more about the background and learning journey of these ladies. Hopefully that'll inspire you to start learning how to code too!

If you could tell a story about yourself in a few sentences, what would it be?

If I were to sum it up in one sentence, it will be this: My life revolves around the love for matcha (green tea). You will never spot me without a matcha snack or drink at any point in time!

What are you currently working as?

My current day job? I’m currently interning at Tinkerbox, a design and software development company! I’m working on an app that helps with automating most of their company’s processes. My responsibilities are to assist the leading developers in developing small parts of the application and fix bugs during test runs. It’s been quite a challenge so far. Minor bugs tend to be found on a daily basis and I have to fix as many bugs as possible before they pile up. It can be an arduous task sometimes but I am enjoying it so far. No complaints!

What sparked your interest in programming?

To really understand my passion for programming, I’ll have to start my story from way back before college. I excelled in Science in high school so my family advised me to take up Chemistry Engineering in college because it has great employment opportunities in Malaysia where I’m from. I followed their advice and studied Chemistry Engineering at The Ohio State University in the United States of America.

I was good at what I was doing back in college but I’ve always thought that there’s something more out there – something I would feel passionate about doing my entire life. And I decided to take a break from school to search for that. I was recounting my story to my friend back in Malaysia when he suggested that I pursue programming. It didn’t make sense at first, but then it all clicked.

I remembered how much fun I had when I was taking some introductory programming classes at the university. You may have heard how satisfying the feeling is of being able to create something – anything – you imagine through programming, and that was the exact emotion that I felt back then. It was as if doors of opportunities suddenly presented themselves in front of me, each one leading me to some path towards creating the next big thing!

My friend also recommended me sites like Codecademy to learn to code from but it was not enough. That’s why I jumped at the opportunity to intern at Tinkerbox when I met the founders through my friends, and now I’m here in Singapore finally learning how to code!

My experiences with programming, even though it is still in its infancy stage, has made me determined to pursue this as a career path. I’m taking a break from college and fully devote my time to becoming a junior developer.

What was your first thought or reaction when you heard about TechLadies?

I was elated, surprised, and thrilled! I said to myself, “Oh my gosh, how can such an excellent program exist without having to pay!”

This is the perfect program for me, and this is exactly what I needed and what I was looking for! Since I’ve decided to take a break from school, I knew that an internship alone is not enough to give me all the learning experience I need to reach my goal of becoming a developer.

I was also enthusiastic about being able to meet more women who share this same passion for technology, to be able to connect with and learn alongside them. As much as this was a fantastic opportunity for the women and myself for me to learn and better my programming skills, it was also something meaningful as I will be able to contribute and serve the community. I haven’t seen a single program that offered such a comprehensive syllabus with a greater purpose in mind.

With this knowledge, I know I can create a tool to make a difference, be it to a community or to change people’s lives and perhaps, livelihood. I would like to use this skill to help people in need.

What do you hope to gain out of joining the TechLadies Coding Programme?

Ultimately, I hope to gain enough out of the program to build something that will allow me to contribute to the community. With this knowledge, I know I can create a tool to make a difference, be it to a community or to change people’s lives and perhaps, livelihood. I would like to use this skill to help people in need.

Looking forward, I sincerely hope to start my career path as a junior web developer, and press on to progress on the career ladder, eventually becoming a skilled web developer who will create the next most empowering, life-changing tech product – like Facebook!

Describe the TechLadies project you’re working on now!

The project we are working on in TechLadies is for the Humanitarian Organisation for Migration Economics (HOME).

HOME is a non-profit organization that aims to give foreign workers the chance to be heard when they encounter an unfair situation or circumstance, such as unpaid salaries, excessive working hours, work injuries, physical, sexual, verbal and psychological abuse. HOME believes in the principles of equality, non-discrimination, and dignity for migrant workers.

Along with two other talented women in my team, and my programme coach Jaryl, we are helping HOME to create a system that helps their organization and clients to communicate more efficiently. We are currently building the active record model, which is part of the ruby on rails application that is responsible for representing business data and logic. In this project, we focus on a couple of main models such as the users, organization, cases and issues. We work with them to link up and make sense of data.

How do you see yourself using your coding skills in the future?

I have big dreams and goals, and I’ll reach them one at a time with the coding skills I’ve learned through my time in the programme!

First and foremost, I’d like to build an e-commerce platform for my sister’s online business. My sister runs a third-generation laksa shop, called Ah Gong Laksa in Johor Bahru, with the aim of modernising a traditional business by selling packaged laksa paste online. I would like to help her create a product to do that. Eventually, I want to work as a junior web developer at a tech company!

Meet Erika – Consultant, Polymath, TechLady

The TechLadies Bootcamp is a 10-week part-time accelerated learning program designed to help women with some basic programming background become professional programmers. Participants are guided by industry experts, creating products for non-profit organizations. 9 ladies were chosen for the first batch of the TechLadies Bootcamp. In this blog series, we will be sharing more about the background and learning journey of these ladies. Hopefully that’ll inspire you to start learning how to code too!

If you could tell a story about yourself in a few sentences, what would it be?

My short story about myself would have to be that I am admittedly a nerd, with an insatiable appetite for learning new things.

What are you currently working on?

I work as an independent strategy consultant in the mining and resources industry. I previously worked at Rio Tinto for five years, managing sales agreements and working on strategy projects for the iron ore marketing division.

After that, I joined The Boston Consulting Group and worked there for 2.5 years. I went into consulting because I was interested in developing strong commercial skills set that would be transferable across several industries, this stems from my strong belief that a skill learnt, one that is meant for a specific field, doesn’t mean it can only be used in that particular field.

After leaving the firm, I found that combining my specialised industry knowledge within the consulting toolkit would be the best way for me to add value to my work as a consultant. I mainly work with clients in the mining industry as I am deeply familiar with the industry and its history. After having worked in mining for several years, I find my clients directly through my own network. I work with my clients to develop and implement strategic initiatives to best position themselves over a 5-10 year timeframe.

At times I also delve into a few other industries because I believe that learning about developments in other industries provides me with a fresher, broader perspective, expanding my view on the strategies, capabilities, and ability to execute work with far greater insight for current projects, and the projects looking forward. There are a number of companies that help to connect ex-management consultants to freelance projects so they have made it possible for me to engage in tech-related projects.

What made you interested in coding?

What first attracted me to coding was the love I have for solving logical problems. I found that learning a coding language required me to tap into this part of my brain, and hence, learning how to code drew my attention. I felt that it would give me greater analytical skills and enhance my problem-solving skills.

I am really excited by how technology is rapidly changing the world we live in. It’s amazing to think about how intertwined our daily lives us with technology. We now rely on applications and smartphones to shop, connect, research, eat, exercise – the list goes on. However, a lot of us don’t understand anything about what goes on “behind the scenes”. I wanted a glimpse into this world, to feed my curiosity, and to benefit from it in every way possible.

Also, I often work with website developers, and sometimes found it hard to understand the jargon – it feels like a whole new language. This experience with learning how to code has really made me better appreciate what goes into developing a website, and the costs and time required to complete tasks.

There are a lot of industries women don’t consider simply because they are not traditionally considered “feminine” and it is a great shame because this thinking can close a lot of potentially promising and enjoyable paths.

What was your first thought or reaction when you heard of TechLadies?

I think it is an excellent initiative to encourage people like myself to take the leap forward with courage. I hold a lot of respect for everyone who has given their time and energy to make this happen. Looking forward, I hope that TechLadies would be engaging in dialogues and collaborate with other initiatives to encourage women to explore non-traditional paths.

I work in mining & resources and management consulting – two areas I have thoroughly enjoyed. However, like coding, both areas are very male dominated. I ended up working in mining because I was in the right place at the right time. I was returning to Perth in 2006 at the beginning of the largest mining boom in history and my background in law and Chinese placed me in a strong position to manage the sales agreements for Rio Tinto. If it hadn’t been for this fortunate set of events I wouldn’t have considered entering the industry. There are a lot of industries girls don’t consider simply because they are not traditionally considered “feminine” and it is a great shame because this thinking can close a lot of potentially promising and enjoyable paths. After my time at Rio Tinto I spent a bit of time working in retail, thinking that as a female I would enjoy it more. What I found was that the retail space was very reactive and fast paced and that my personality was unexpectedly more suited to mining. At the end, perceptions of which industries were more feminine and masculine had absolutely nothing to do with what suited me better – and I’m sure that women who give programming a chance would be able to resonate with this.

Every industry offers boundless of knowledge and experience for both men and women to gain and benefit from. I just know that when all industries leave themselves more open being inclusive and diverse, the perspectives, discussions and solutions made would benefit everyone.

Why did you want to apply to the TechLadies Coding Programme?

I love learning new things. I think we should never stop learning. The tech scene is such a vibrant and exciting one and everyone is so welcoming and friendly so it was also a great chance to meet new and inspiring people who are doing great things.

I also strongly believe that learning how to program would not only open more doors of opportunity for me, but it would also improve my abilities in both my career and life. This fed my drive to applying for the TechLadies’ flagship 8-week coding program that I was fortunately accepted into. I’ve never regretted it since.

What do you hope to gain out of the TechLadies Coding Programme?

I started learning python in my spare time and want to understand what else it could be used for. I feel somewhat like somebody who’s just learnt a new language, who’s looking out for someone to practice it with so that we will both benefit from it.

After working with TechLadies, I found myself spending more time understanding Django, a Python framework, and I’m proud to admit that I can now see how Python can be used to create a website.

This process and discovery have opened my eyes to understand that the applicability of coding languages is exceptionally broad. Python can be used to develop websites, games, and conduct predictive data analytics. The possibilities are seemingly endless, and that’s what excites me and I believe, excites other programmers as well.

Describe the TechLadies project you’re working on and what parts you’re building on now.

We’re developing an online platform for people in the Asian Film Archives (AFA) to submit to have their films archived. I’ve been working on the contact form, which will allow people to contact Asian Film Archives directly with the queries they may have.

How do you see yourself using your coding skills?

With this new set of skills, I can not only develop basic web applications, but I may also use it to better communicate with web developers, which is a huge bonus for me, seeing as I am required to speak with them fairly often.

Looking forward, I’d love to work on creating platforms to help teams work more efficiently and effectively in the workplaces of different industries and fields.

Meet Kate – Idealist, Problem Solver, TechLady

The TechLadies Bootcamp is a 10-week part-time accelerated learning program designed to help women with some basic programming background become professional programmers. Participants are guided by industry experts, creating products for non-profit organizations. 9 ladies were chosen for the first batch of the TechLadies Bootcamp. In this blog series, we will be sharing more about the background and learning journey of these ladies. Hopefully that'll inspire you to start learning how to code too!

If you could tell a story about yourself, what would it be?

My big loves are travelling, the outdoors, hiking, people and good ideas that inspire the world to be a smarter, better place.

Someone who I look up to is Jacqueline Novogratz, Founder and CEO of the Acumen Fund. Acumen’s mission is to change the way the world tackles poverty through patient capital – it is the marriage of the smart-headed businessman and good-hearted philanthropist. Over the last 15 years, they have helped to bring affordable water, light, food, healthcare, education and technology to the poor, through supporting and investing in businesses.

I hope to be able to bring positive value to someone else’s life through my work.

What are you currently working as?

I am currently looking for new work opportunities, preferably in a startup or technology.

After graduating from SMU, I was at a loss of what career path to pursue. I had a couple of internships but I don’t feel fulfilled in those industries. If I had to spend so much my time at a job, it had better be something I love. I joined Singapore Airlines to do what I love, travel. It paid well, I was excellent at it, I got to see a lot of the world and I learnt a lot. Amazing as it was, that life lost its shine eventually.

I left to join a pharmaceutical company as a sales representative. Hit the sales targets of course, but thankfully I was tasked to work with different stakeholders to help patients reduce their medical costs and educate the medical community. It paid well enough, I was good at it and I brought some value by making good medication available and slightly more affordable for patients who needed it.

Still, I wanted more.

A friend put it clearly into 2 words – “Finding Ikigai”. Work should have a purpose that is in line with the self.

Ikigai
Call it your love, passion, your belief system, whatever. In the words of Steve Jobs: “You have to be burning with an idea, or a problem, or a wrong that you want to right. If you’re not passionate enough from the start, you’ll never stick it out.”

Learning how to code has made me feel empowered to create something that can be of real value to others. I want to be part of the tech world that can bring real solutions that people need and empower them too.

Knowing how to code is empowerment. It puts the power to create in your hands!

What made you interested in programming?

We had this course in university, Computer as an Analysis Tool, and that was really my first taste of writing codes. We were doing a project with Excel VBA and knew nothing about it. I’m not even sure if you can really call it coding, but the 5am brain-cracking late nights and then finally getting an A+ got me feeling really ecstatic.

Alongside my job as a cabin crew, I’ve also dabbled in e-commerce selling coffee and branded goods on eBay, Instagram and WordPress. Learning how to create your own website and making that extra cash was another high.

There are so many apps out there that makes our lives better. But there are still many occasions that I wished there was another app. Here’s my wish list.

  • Please, someone do an online platform that can help a mentoring program like Big Brothers Big Sisters of America reach more people
  • Please, someone do an app for SQ cabin crew, so it wouldn’t be a pain every time we want to change flights with a colleague to be around for a class, exam, family event or wedding
  • Please, someone make an app so I could get my manuka honey for a reasonable price after I quit (cheers to AirFrov)

The final straw came when I heard stories from two of my close friends who took a year off their 9-to-5 jobs to set up a web and iOS app. They are both smart people with a great idea, but they are both non-technical. One of their developers disappeared and another charged $20,000 to create a prototype.

That was the point when I realised, that having some knowledge in coding will allow you to test ideas quickly without a huge initial investment (in either money or time). This will give you an idea of whether the idea is feasible or how it should be tweaked to satisfy users’ needs.

Knowing how to code is empowerment. It puts the power to create in your hands!

What was your first thought or reaction when you hear about TechLadies?

The TechLadies post on Facebook I came across a few days after speaking to my friend, was really just serendipity.

When I first saw TechLadies page on Facebook, it showcased pictures of its very well-received launch party. There are so many other individuals who are interested in learning to code and being more involved in the tech community. I realised that I was not alone! Also, I’ve never been part of a for-ladies-only group, so this calls out to the little feminist in me.

Why did you want to apply to the TechLadies Coding Programme?

A supportive community, like technology, is an enabler. The TechLadies Coding Program supports us in learning how to code while working on a project for an NGO. Having a shared vision, a goal, and deliverable that has real-life application is a huge motivational force.

Learning something together as a group is very different from learning on your own. This programme provides a community that can understand the challenges we face and learn from each other. The motivation and support from the coaches and community is invaluable to the learning journey!

What do you hope to gain out of the TechLadies Coding Programme?

Mastery of a programming language is an even longer journey than I first imagined – maybe deeper and more expansive than the ocean is.

My learning goal is to learn how to code in Ruby on Rails, in order to build an effective web app for HOME (Humanitarian Organisation for Migration Economics). Creating a solution that solves a problem is the goal here. By working on a real-world application, this gives me a good knowledge base to further explore Ruby’s capabilities in the future.

Describe the TechLadies project you’re working on!

HOME is a society and charity that serves to uphold the rights of migrant workers in Singapore. I chose to work on this project for 2 reasons:

  1. I have a very good relationship with my domestic helper who has been with my family for more than a decade. My parents have brought me up to treat her like family. She has sacrificed watching her children grow up and cared for my sisters and I as we grew up.
  2. There are bad people in the world who think that position power and money translates to a right to take advantage of others. It’s unbelievable.

We are currently building a web application to help HOME better manage and update their cases. What excites me about this project is how some features of the web app will help HOME to look through their database more efficiently. For instance, it can highlight which companies or individuals have a repeated history of abusing and violating the rights of migrant workers in Singapore. They can also better track what are the common issues migrant workers face and provide the press with requested data.

So, to the bad people: watch your backs if you don’t want to land on the front page.

What do you see yourself using your coding skills for?

Right now, I am working on ideation for a friend’s business idea and as practice for myself, hope to use Ruby to create a prototype to help her get funding.

At the same time, I am currently looking for new work opportunities and believe that my coding skills will complement roles in tech startups and companies. I’m looking for an opportunity in programming and am open to sales and marketing positions, as long as I’m in the tech industry.

Meet Vina – WordPress Developer, Musician, TechLady

The TechLadies Bootcamp is a 10-week part-time accelerated learning program designed to help women with some basic programming background become professional programmers. Participants are guided by industry experts, creating products for non-profit organizations. 9 ladies were chosen for the first batch of the TechLadies Bootcamp. In this blog series, we will be sharing more about the background and learning journey of these ladies. Hopefully that'll inspire you to start learning how to code too!

If you could tell a story about yourself in a few sentences, what would it be?

Hi, my name is Vina! I lead a life filled with spontaneity, with a belief that there is always something new and meaningful for me to learn.

Currently, I freelance as a WordPress developer. But that’s not all I do. I’m quite musically inclined and can play by ear! The keyboard and the guitar are my favourite instruments to work with.

What is your current day job?

I’m a freelance WordPress developer so that I could make time for myself to learn and pick up a new skill. Recently, I’ve been trying out a few gigs as a music facilitator and I’ve enjoyed it very much.

Prior to being a freelancer, I worked in an advertising agency as their last-standing developer. It’s a long story to how I ended up in that position. I graduated from the University of Wollongong with a degree in Computer Science and I received a full scholarship from S.P. Jain Institute of Management & Research to pursue an MBA. That’s why I came to Singapore (from Indonesia), completed my MBA, and realised that while I have a foundation in business and computer science, I don’t have a specialized skill.

To hone in on my technical skills, I joined in this advertising agency as the 3rd developer on the team. After my team members left the company, I became the only person to help the entire team transit smoothly from being a traditional print-based agency to a full-fledged digital marketing agency. It was SO hectic! Because we were short on time and resources, I had to focus on using WordPress to build websites for our clients since it was the fastest way to do so. This went on for five full years before I realised that while WordPress is a fantastic tool, expertise in WordPress isn’t the skill that I wanted. I want to learn how to build an application from scratch, but the heavy workload at my job means that I wouldn’t have the time to do that.

An opportunity came when my professor from S.P. Jain approached me to help him create a website for a soup kitchen he’s helping at. That was my first freelancing gig and gave me the confidence to leave my job to make time for learning the skills I wanted.

What made you interested in coding?

When I was a kid back in the 90s, I used to watch my dad used word processors like WordStar, Lotus 123, and MS-DOS, despite not having a background in computer science or engineering. Watching him work away during the evenings fascinated the little 8-year-old me – he would type something on the keyboard and the computer will magically display something! While I couldn’t comprehend the mechanics behind it at that point in time, it was etched into my memory. Soon after, computing became a subject taught in my school. I got to learn and understand the same programs my dad used, MS-DOS!

What was your first thought or reaction when you heard of TechLadies?

I got to know of the TechLadies program during a Ruby meetup in Singapore where I spoke to Elisha, the TechLadies founder. The idea of making a coding program which focuses on building a real, scalable project available to women (for free!), was so appealing!

I had my reservations, though. Based on my experience, completion of a project would usually take much longer where the number of hours spent working on it is concerned. What’s more, the course covers a mix of both theory and hands-on work. I wasn’t quite sure if what that entailed – and was unsure if we would get to do much of the project ourselves.

When the announcement of the flagship 8-week coding program was made, I was pumped to hear that this was actually happening, and went ahead with the application, fervently hoping that mine would be chosen!

Why did you want to apply to the TechLadies Coding Program?

After I’ve left my job, I started looking out for languages to learn and avenues to learn them. I’ve attended community-led workshops and meetups for Ruby on Rails and Objective-C but found that those languages didn’t resonate with me, and while the workshops were good, they don’t provide enough knowledge for me to understand what I’m doing.

Then I found out about PyLadies, a series of workshops to teach women how to code with Python. I attended a few and realised that Python “clicked” with me. That’s why when I’ve heard that one of the projects for the TechLadies Coding Program will be done with Python, it was a no-brainer for me to jump at the chance!

What do you hope to gain out of TechLadies?

Initially, my goal was to learn enough to build something from nothing, and gain new friends who shared similar passions. Now, and increasingly so, I want to become a full-stack Python and Django developer!

Describe the TechLadies project you’re working on!

We are working for Asian Film Archive to develop a web application that accepts film submissions. Think of it as the IMDB for Asian films, it’s a very interesting idea!

The best part of the project is to work with our mentor, Martin. Martin is a fantastic developer that never ceases to amaze us. He’s someone who breathes, walks, and sleeps Python and Django; it’s crazy! Through the process so far, he’s given us great guidance and advice on Python, Django, Ansible, Mkdocs and more. Learning directly from his thought-process was super helpful when we’re building new things from scratch. I think this is the best value of joining the TechLadies Coding Programme.

Right now, we are working on implementing the Django models for our app. My task is to create the Event model, which basically defines how the database table looks like. We need this to eventually build a timeline of events so that the administrators can see how a film submissions’ status has changed over time.

What do you see yourself using your coding skills for?

I would like to build a portfolio with a large selection of applications that people can benefit from and enjoy using, with an unlimited budget and fair deadlines proposed. Perhaps, if I can indulge in this thought, I would set up a company that provides healthy food for my team and work with a bunch of adventurous, exciting and forward-looking people.

Since technology is always changing, I will let myself adapt and keep up with it. I’m thankful for the large programming community in Singapore that looks to give so much to anyone who’s hungry to learn. This naturally makes me want to reach out to those who want to learn and help them out, too, regardless of their background!

Meet Yiting – Polyglot, Volunteer, TechLady

The TechLadies Bootcamp is a 10-week part-time accelerated learning program designed to help women with some basic programming background become professional programmers. Participants are guided by industry experts, creating products for non-profit organizations. 9 ladies were chosen for the first batch of the TechLadies Bootcamp. In this blog series, we will be sharing more about the background and learning journey of these ladies. Hopefully that’ll inspire you to start learning how to code too!

If you could tell a story about yourself in one sentence, what would it be?

Yi is the giraffe that every city needs because of her super ability to continually evolve from acquiring new tongues; she will soon speak computer too.

What is your currently working as?

I’m a final year student at the National University of Singapore majoring in English Linguistics. In addition to school, I am learning three foreign languages (French, Spanish, and German). On Saturdays, I help out at Blk 2 Furever Canines – a shelter with some of the sweetest dogs around. At Blk 2, I bathe, walk, and break up fights between the dogs. Since they are short of volunteers, I also design fundraising posters!

What made you interested in coding?

I’ve always been interested in HTML and CSS since the glorious days of Blogskins.com. I learnt to create my own blog templates through copying from the grandmasters of blog templates, and then editing parts of the HTML and CSS to my liking. It is always fun to make your own layouts and to see the code come alive.

But my passion for programming really started when I took the class CS3216 “Software Development on  Evolving Platforms” in NUS. I was lucky enough to take on the role as a designer during that class; I met the best of the coding talents in the university. It’s incredible to watch an idea turn from something on the drawing board into reality. To watch the coding talents live in action was like watching magic.

What was your thought or reaction when you first heard of TechLadies?

I don’t want to be that person, but… “Oh my god, it’s free!”

Why did you want to apply to the TechLadies Coding Programme?

The main hook was the mentorship that came with the programme. I’m a big fan of self­-directed learning but I’m also a believer in getting help where needed. Mentorship is a great way to kickstart my new learning journey especially so when code looks undecipherable, like an arbitrary combination of letters and numbers, to a beginner like myself.

I want to graduate from this programme with enough skills to inspire other girls to try coding too!

What do you hope to gain out of the TechLadies Coding Programme?

I want to graduate from this programme with enough skills to inspire other girls to try coding too! I know this goal sounds a bit of a stretch considering I’m just only starting out. But I know of many girls who are put off by how scary coding appears. These are girls who excel in Maths and Sciences, but somehow find programming as something unapproachable.

When I’m confident enough in my coding skills, I hope I can teach my female friends programming; many of them are interested in coding, but like me, they find it difficult to get started.

Describe the TechLadies project you’re working on!

I’m working on Asian Film Archive’s (AFA) Emergency Reel Project. We are trying to improve upon the existing process that filmmakers undergo when they upload their films onto AFA. Currently, our team is building more subsections to make the site complete, such as the FAQ and the Event sections.

What do you see yourself using coding skills in the future?

I really want to create my own website from scratch! I would also love to use my skills to create a site for Blk 2 – it would be wickedly helpful in our fundraising efforts and in getting the world to meet our dogs. I’ve not finalised my idea, but it will be an app that drives donations for the shelter and promotes our dogs for adoption.

My ultimate goal would be to create a project related to travelling. I want to marry my love for exploring and visual storytelling with technology!

Meet Sandy – Air Stewardess, Coder, TechLady

The TechLadies Bootcamp is a 10-week part-time accelerated learning program designed to help women with some basic programming background become professional programmers. Participants are guided by industry experts, creating products for non-profit organizations. 9 ladies were chosen for the first batch of the TechLadies Bootcamp. In this blog series, we will be sharing more about the background and learning journey of these ladies. Hopefully that'll inspire you to start learning how to code too!

If you could tell a story about yourself in one sentence, what would it be?

I am a geeky air stewardess who is learning to code and believes that technology can democratise education in developing countries.

What is your current day job?

I am currently an air stewardess based in Singapore. Prior to that, I was working in the sales department at Asus in Taiwan. That was where I decided that I am going to realise my dream of travelling around the world and be paid while at it. This is why I relocated to Singapore to become an air stewardess.

What made you interested in coding?

I first became interested in coding after reading Marc Andreessen’s “Why software is eating the world?” article. I have been coding for three months now, and I feel the coding is like a superpower that allows me to solve problems around me!

Recently, I noticed that my passion for coding has superseded my desire to see the world. I stayed in my hotel room to study while my peers were out sight-seeing or shopping when we were overseas, sometimes even after going for 24 hours without sleep. Of course it’s a hard trade-off and it’s something I do feel a little sad about, but I know that programming is something I really resonate with. I really want to create something from scratch, I want be better at programming.

What was your thought or reaction when you first heard of TechLadies?

Initially, I thought it was a branch of Girls in Tech organisation, and then I realised it is a totally new organisation that is very energetic and growing fast.

Why did you want to apply to the TechLadies Coding Program?

I want to join TechLadies for three reasons. Firstly, despite learning how to code for some time, I have not found many opportunities to apply it, and I think TechLadies’ approach of learning by coding a real­-world project is a great approach. Secondly, learning to code by myself can get lonely, and I would like to find like-­minded friends to learn and improve together. Lastly, I agree with TechLadies’ mission of helping women get into programming, and would like to be part of the initiative.

What do you hope to gain out of the TechLadies Coding Program?

I have been learning how to code over the last three months, and recently shipped my first rails app a simple blog (https://sandytseng.herokuapp.com/). Though it is extremely basic and needs a lot of improvement, the feeling of creating something is extremely satisfying. I believe that coding is like a superpower that can solve problems, and I hope that after the TechLadies course, I will have the skill set to solve more complex problems. My ultimate goal is to use software to provide education for children living in rural villages.

Describe the TechLadies project you’re working on!

We are remodelling the website for an NGO in Singapore called HOME (Humanitarian Organization for Migration Economics), which is focused on preventing the exploitation of foreign workers. I picked this project as I am a foreign worker myself. I remembered facing problems when I just arrived at Singapore so I could understand the pain faced by the migrant workers HOME is helping. To me, what HOME is doing is very meaningful and I am elated to be able to help in their mission!

I would like to use my skills to help provide educational opportunities to underprivileged kids in developing countries.

How would you use your coding skills in the future?

I would like to transition to the tech sector, and hope to join a software company or startup. In the long term, I would like to use my skills to help provide educational opportunities to underprivileged kids in developing countries. I envision a world where children can learn essential skills online, no matter where they are located.

Right now I’m helping out at my boyfriend’s education company, KidStartNow. KidStartNow teaches Chinese to children via a program that provides customised materials tailored for each child. Hopefully, we can bring this company to children living in rural villages all over the world!

Meet Xin Tian – Dropout, Customer Service Rep, TechLady

The TechLadies Bootcamp is a 10-week part-time accelerated learning program designed to help women with some basic programming background become professional programmers. Participants are guided by industry experts, creating products for non-profit organizations. 9 ladies were chosen for the first batch of the TechLadies Bootcamp. In this blog series, we will be sharing more about the background and learning journey of these ladies. Hopefully that’ll inspire you to start learning how to code too!

If you could tell a story about yourself in a few sentences, what would it be?

I was extremely lost and my self-confidence fell tremendously after being kicked out from NUS Master programme two years ago. Today, I am here standing up again to pursue my new-found dream.

What is your current day job? 

I am currently working as a customer service officer in MyRepublic. I’m not sure if it is still considered a ‘startup’ company, but my role revolves around handling all sorts of issues that the customers of MyRepublic face, such as billing, order processing, and technical related support. My technical skills are geared more so towards hardware-related technical support, such as router or Internet-related troubleshooting.

Before this, I was enrolled in a chemical engineering masters program, but that only lasted for a while. It was funny how it happened, now that I think about it. I made my naive decision to join the chemical engineering masters program out of my passion for chemistry, and I enrolled myself in the course thinking I would have the freedom to choose my modules. It turns out that I couldn’t. What’s more, most of the modules resolved around physics, not chemistry. Of course, I was disappointed. Because I didn’t fair well, I was kicked out from the programme. I then began my career in MyRepublic as a customer service officer. I enjoy working in an environment so vibrant, where everyone had to hustle, be agile, and take up different roles and responsibilities. It is a very exciting and engaging experience!

During this period of time, a close friend of mine introduced me to the concepts of programming by showing me what could be created with code. It intrigued me, and eventually sparked an interest in me for all things tech and startup. I began researching almost obsessively, and with each new startup, each new tech-related service or product that I read up about, my passion and appetite for tech grew.

To me, the thing that attracted me to code is not coding itself, but the magic that coding can achieve.

What made you interested in programming?

To me, the thing that attracted me to code is not coding itself, but the magic that coding can achieve. The magic of being able to turn any idea into a real product amazes me, be it for business purpose or for the sake of helping people, was what drew my attention to coding and learning how to code.

What was your first thought or reaction when you heard about TechLadies?

Excited, like really excited! I’ve been keeping an eye out for coding bootcamps for a while, but time and financial constraints kept me from enrolling in them.

A couple of months ago, I joined in one of the workshops held at HackerSpace SG. Since then, I kept up with the news and posts on their Facebook page. During one of those days where I did my mindless scrolling through of my social media channels, I chanced upon a post from HackerSpace SG’s Facebook page that mentioned TechLadies. I decided to check it out, out of curiosity, and pleasantly surprised myself when I found out that it was exactly what I’m looking for all this while – something I don’t have to pay an expensive tuition fee for and don’t have to quit my full-time job to do.

Why did you want to apply to TechLadies?

I had been learning to programme by myself through all the online courses for the past one year during my free time after work. I did an HTML and CSS course with Treehouse and Code Academy, and bought a course off Udemy as well, in my attempt to learn how to code on my own.

However, I couldn’t really progress much without real life experiences. I would easily forget all the theories that I have learnt after a while since I have no chance to apply them. Moreover, I spent most of my days in a job that has nothing to do with what I really want to do, which was to code and create.

What do you hope to gain out of joining the TechLadies Coding Programme?

I hope that I would gain enough knowledge and experience that will enable me to get a backend developer job, which hopefully I will spend most of my time learning and improving my coding skills through hands-on experience. I decided that I wanted to work on backend development as I was genuinely more interested in the creation of the ‘skeletal’ structure of a working program. So far in my journey with TechLadies, things are going pretty well. With practice, I’m confident that I will achieve my goal!

Describe the TechLadies project you’re working on now!

The project I’m working on right now focuses on revamping the Engineers.sg website, and currently we are working on the newsletter subscription module. I am in charge of the newsletter subscription form, which I mainly work on rendering the view, error message and link them to the controller.

How do you see yourself using your coding skills in the future?

One day in the future I would like to use my coding skills to build my own tech startup/social enterprise. I am also actively picking up some entrepreneurship skills, too. This passion ignited after participating in the UNited We Hack hackathon organised by UN Women. I joined that hackathon with two of my friends who were backend and frontend developers themselves.

I represented my group as a pitcher as I didn’t have prior programming experiences then. Our hackathon topic revolved around empowering women, and so my group went ahead in developing a mobile app named “Her Voice”, that uses voice recording to share women’s stories virtually. We open sourced our work and you can find the codes on Github.

The hackathon ended on a bright note for us, because we won first place! This experience triggered something in me. After the experience with the masters degree course, I was slowly and surely building up my confidence and hope for my future. Her Voice’s vision and mission left me with high hopes of building a community where one woman’s story inspires another, leaving women in the community with high hopes and courage to dream.

After TechLadies, I will be working towards building a sustainable social enterprise. How I will do this, I’m not so sure now. But I believe that every little step I make now will count!